DIY Guitar // Part 1: Supplies + Testing

I am thrilled that Jake and I have finally started our big project of designing a guitar body and then getting it all set up and wired to play! I previewed the project in this photo at the beginning of the summer, and it has taken us this long to do all of our research and gather the supplies. This project is a bit of an undertaking, so we will be sharing it as a series of posts over the next few weeks. Stay tuned! Today we will be sharing all of the supplies we will use throughout the process, how we chose the guitar, and some experimentation we did to prep.

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After doing our research, we gathered everything we thought we would need to design, stain, and finish the body of the guitar. Here are some of the supplies we are using:

-Miquelrius sketchbook & ink pen, for design ideas -pencil, for testing the art on the guitar body -woodburner, for the art -pliers, useful to change out tips of the wood burner -rubber gloves, for staining -staining pads, for applying the stain -Minwax Emerald Express Wiping Stain, we chose a green stain for the body! -220 grit sandpaper, a very fine grit to help us smooth out the body gently -steel wool, to sand off the oil coatings after staining -Tru-Oil and cheesecloth (not pictured), which is what we will be using to make the guitar shiny after the staining process is complete.

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The body we chose is a Warmoth Musiclander. Jake was awesome and let me help choose the shape from the Warmoth Custom Body Builder. I preferred all of the "Modern Styles" but decided on the Musiclander because it wasn't too crazy, and still had a traditional feel to it. Jake liked this choice as well, and that was that!

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The guitar is made of Alder wood. So far it has proved easy to work with, which is great. It is also a beautiful color. We considered going with a brown-toned stain and even had it in our cart at Home Depot, but at the last minute spotted the Emerald version and thought, why not? We did however have to track the color down on Amazon, because it isn't stocked through Home Depot.

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We were then ready to prep the guitar for sanding. The body is high quality, so it was already pretty smooth, but we went over it with a very gentle 220 grit to get it perfect.

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Testing beforehand is always a good idea. We wore rubber gloves and then squirted some stain out onto a paper plate. Then dip a staining pad into the stain. A little goes a long way when it comes to this product, so work with it in very small amounts. We then rubbed it along the direction of the woodgrain, on a test piece of wood from the craft store. You can test different methods and how many coats you would like at this point.

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Since we decided to wood burn our design into the guitar, I practiced that on the scrap wood as well. This was useful to test out the new tips I had purchased, to see what each one can do. In the third part of this series, I will elaborate on each tip and what kind of results they will create!

That's all for now! Thanks so much for reading and check back soon for the next part of our series, the Design + Sketching process!

Room Tour // California Edition

DSC_1125 Something I worked hard on all year was decorating my space. At school I lived in a house with 4 of my friends, and had my own room. If you know me, I have a need to make everything around me designed. Adding color and art to my room keeps me sane. I have since moved out of this room because I'll be abroad next year, but was sure to snap some photos throughout the year. I hope you enjoy my space and all of my DIY enhancements!

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This shelf was a leftover display piece from Anthropologie. When my internship ended, I took it home and added a coat of red paint to make it pop on the white walls. It held my architecture books, special photos, DIY Gold Skull, and bone paintings, which are available here

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This piece is another one of my personal paintings. Like it? Make it your own!

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This DIY Pegboard Organizer added an industrial touch to the room, made out of scraps from my school's wood shop. Make your own!

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This DIY Crate Table was one of the final changes I made to my room. It helped me get organized by creating a place for my camera equipment and a spot to drop my keys when I walked in the door. Not to mention, the perfect place to store my records and record player so I could jam out! Check out the tutorial!

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My favorite part of my room was hanging up my skateboard art and continuously working on them throughout the year. This wall was ever-changing as I sold art and got new commissions. Pictured: Skull Coffin Deck, Coalition Ribcage Deck

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A final small moment in my room, one of my favorite records and this DIY studded beanie. [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqZWWw4a6Es&w=560&h=315]

Thank you so much for checking out my little space! Soon I will be sharing my room at home because I recently cleared some old things out and spruced it up! See you tomorrow, x.

DIY_Removable Boot Tassels

DSC_0954 Fringe is an embellishment that I want on a lot of my accessories such as purses and shoes, but sometimes I want a cleaner, simpler look as well. This DIY is perfect for that! Make these fringe tassels for your favorite plain ankle boots, but the best part? They're just attached with duct tape so they are 100% removable and reusable. Win win.

I learned how to make these from one of the best DIY blogs P.S. I made this. Check out the simple tutorial here and check out my results below!

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The only supplies you will need are some faux leather, scissors, and duct tape. I had some faux leather left over from this DIY clutch, but you can find it at fabric stores. P.S. my ankle boots are from Target!

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And here is my finished product! I am so excited about these and the fact that I can take them off when they don't exactly work with my outfit.

Thanks so much for reading! Keep up will all of my projects here:

instagram / facebook / tumblr / bloglovin' / twitter / pinterest / youtube

ARCHITECTURE_Lasercut Chandelier

DSC_0751 I've been dying to share about this project ever since I finished it in the fall, but had to wait until I hung it up and it could be properly displayed. I made this chandelier last quarter for an annual furniture competition at my school that is held for architecture students. I created the fixture out of plumbing pipe, and then laser cut the "crystals" out of plexiglass. I chose to keep these materials in their raw form because I wanted to create something beautiful that had an honest materiality and was made out of unexpected items. The choice to make my own crystals was also due to the fact that chandelier crystals are very expensive, and I wanted to create a dialogue about digital fabrication.

By the way, these crystals may be familiar if you've seen this necklace I made and wore in this outfit post.

Below I've included the poster that was displayed next to my piece at the show, and talks a little more about the concept of the project!

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Next I've included some process photos. I cut and assembled the pipe frame in my school's wood shop, and spent two days in my studio using jewelry jump rings to hook all of the pieces together--there were over 1,000 individual crystals!

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And finally, here are the photos of the finished product hanging up in my home! I'm so excited to have it displayed and want to create a little seating area underneath it.

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Thanks so much for reading! I will be posting another lighting fixture project made out of plumbing pipe that is a little simpler if you want to make one yourself, so stay tuned for that. Until then, keep up with all my projects on Instagram @punkrockparti.

If you're interested in a custom chandelier, please contact me by email at ppoppe@cox.net