DIY Guitar // Part 1: Supplies + Testing

I am thrilled that Jake and I have finally started our big project of designing a guitar body and then getting it all set up and wired to play! I previewed the project in this photo at the beginning of the summer, and it has taken us this long to do all of our research and gather the supplies. This project is a bit of an undertaking, so we will be sharing it as a series of posts over the next few weeks. Stay tuned! Today we will be sharing all of the supplies we will use throughout the process, how we chose the guitar, and some experimentation we did to prep.

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After doing our research, we gathered everything we thought we would need to design, stain, and finish the body of the guitar. Here are some of the supplies we are using:

-Miquelrius sketchbook & ink pen, for design ideas -pencil, for testing the art on the guitar body -woodburner, for the art -pliers, useful to change out tips of the wood burner -rubber gloves, for staining -staining pads, for applying the stain -Minwax Emerald Express Wiping Stain, we chose a green stain for the body! -220 grit sandpaper, a very fine grit to help us smooth out the body gently -steel wool, to sand off the oil coatings after staining -Tru-Oil and cheesecloth (not pictured), which is what we will be using to make the guitar shiny after the staining process is complete.

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The body we chose is a Warmoth Musiclander. Jake was awesome and let me help choose the shape from the Warmoth Custom Body Builder. I preferred all of the "Modern Styles" but decided on the Musiclander because it wasn't too crazy, and still had a traditional feel to it. Jake liked this choice as well, and that was that!

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The guitar is made of Alder wood. So far it has proved easy to work with, which is great. It is also a beautiful color. We considered going with a brown-toned stain and even had it in our cart at Home Depot, but at the last minute spotted the Emerald version and thought, why not? We did however have to track the color down on Amazon, because it isn't stocked through Home Depot.

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We were then ready to prep the guitar for sanding. The body is high quality, so it was already pretty smooth, but we went over it with a very gentle 220 grit to get it perfect.

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Testing beforehand is always a good idea. We wore rubber gloves and then squirted some stain out onto a paper plate. Then dip a staining pad into the stain. A little goes a long way when it comes to this product, so work with it in very small amounts. We then rubbed it along the direction of the woodgrain, on a test piece of wood from the craft store. You can test different methods and how many coats you would like at this point.

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Since we decided to wood burn our design into the guitar, I practiced that on the scrap wood as well. This was useful to test out the new tips I had purchased, to see what each one can do. In the third part of this series, I will elaborate on each tip and what kind of results they will create!

That's all for now! Thanks so much for reading and check back soon for the next part of our series, the Design + Sketching process!

DIY_Patched Denim Jacket + Video

DIY INTRO Today I've got a classic DIY project for you, a patched denim jacket. While you may know how to sew on a patch, I wanted to share the little patch collection I've been building for a few months now, and how my final product turned out! I was also wanting to play around with my new camera now that I could record HD video, and this seemed to be the perfect project to start with! Check out my video, or see the photos of my jacket below!

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-SAV4MEAbs&w=560&h=315]

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yin yang patch_local record store american flag patch_came with camo jacket Rancid patch_Amoeba records Amoeba patch_Amoeba records daisy chain patch_local craft store

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I picked up this jacket over the summer at Goodwill. You may remember it from this outfit post!

Thanks so much for reading! I'll be back tomorrow with an outfit post wearing my jacket!

Don't forget to follow Punkrockparti on bloglovin'!

OOTD_77: "The Downfall of Us All"

DSC_0678 the iridescent trend is in full swing from shoes to jewelry, but my favorite pieces have to be clutches. they give your outfit a bold pop of color, that is extra shiny as well. this is why i was so excited when my friend Courtney got me this H&M clutch for Christmas recently! i love what it adds to my outfit.

the track for today's outfit is "The Downfall of Us All" by A Day to Remember. this band has helped me power through my homework the past few days, and always for that matter. listen along here while you view!

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although its a bit bold, i decided to incorporate other green pieces in my wardrobe for this look as well. i pulled out two of my favorite DIY pieces, my plaid studded blazer and my Unif-inspired tee. finally, i edged up the look even more with my Creepers and spiked bracelet. let's be honest...i think this might be my favorite outfit to date!

plaid studded blazer_Goodwill DIY, see my tutorial here unif inspired tee_DIY, see my tutorial here cutoff shorts_vintage Levi's, eBay creepers_Amazon, similar available here iridescent clutch_H&M, gift from Courtney spike bracelet_So Good, New Orleans. similar available here

DIY_Studded Beanie

DSC_0742 It's been a while since I've posted a DIY, but this is a good one! It's simple, inexpensive, fast, and very on trend. I have seen these beanies for sale online for at least $20. Don't be crazy and pay that price when you can make one for under 5 bucks. Mine was $4! You could even stud one that you already own--even better!

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Start with a cheap beanie. Mine is from the men's section at Target, and was $4 as mentioned before. You will also need around 12 studs, give or take a few. Mine were from a thrifted belt. Speaking of which, that belt has supplied all of my past studding projects for the last 5 months. Score.

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Begin attaching the studs to your beanie. I liked the way mine looked with a folded edge. Attach the studs and fold down the prongs using a tweezer. If you need extra help, check out my tips in this past tutorial of mine.

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Continue studding all the way around the edge of your beanie. You can do the spacing however you'd like. This should only take you a few minutes!

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And here's the finished product! I loooove how this had added some extra spice to my plain beanie, and adds femininity to something from the men's section.

Thanks so much for checking out this tutorial, I hope you enjoyed it! If you try out this project, I'd love to see the result. Tweet me @PaigePoppe or show it to me on Instagram @punkrockparti and use the hashtag #punkrockparti See you tomorrow!